Online banking apps including ANZ, Westpac and Commonwealth Bank crash after major outage


Online banking apps including ANZ, Westpac and Commonwealth Bank crash after major outage

  • Major Australian bank websites and apps crashed in large-scale outage
  • Users time out on desktop websites and get app error messages
  • ATMs have also been reported to be out of order in locations across the country
  • Amazon, Australia Post, Telstra and Optus were also caught in the crash
  • Services started coming back online after the crash at around 3:35 p.m. Thursday










Internet banking services for Australian banks have declined as a global blackout hits apps and websites.

The websites of major banks, including ANZ and Commonwealth Bank, were on hold for customers on Thursday afternoon.

The websites of major banks, including ANZ and Commonwealth Bank, were due for customers on Thursday afternoon

Internet banking services for Australian banks slump as global blackout hits apps and websites

Bank of Melbourne and Westpac are also reportedly unavailable to users, as well as banks in New Zealand.

A message on the ANZ app told customers, “Sorry, something went wrong. Please try again later. If you need help, call us anytime.”

A post on the ANZ app told customers:

A message on the ANZ app told customers: “Sorry, something went wrong. Please try again later. If you need help, call us anytime”

Some ATMs have also been reported to be out of order, with reports of in-store machines failing during the outage as well.

An issue with the international content delivery network platform Akamai – which provides the backbone for major online services – is believed to be involved in the crash.

Some ATMs have also been reported out of service, with reports of in-store machines failing during the outage as well.

Some ATMs have also been reported out of service, with reports of in-store machines failing during the outage as well.

Data from internet watchdog downdetector.com.au revealed the extent of the outage, with all major banks affected as well as blue-chip companies like Telstra and Optus.

Amazon, Minecraft, Australia Post and the NBN website were also victims of the crash, according to the website.

Services began to come back online around 3:35 p.m. Thursday, about 90 minutes after the first reports of problems.

However, the Virgin Australia website has remained down despite the return of other sites.

Australian CDN company peakhour.io said the latest outage affecting these large companies highlighted the fact that anyone can be the victim of a network outage.

A content delivery network is a global network of cloud-based computers designed to improve the speed, security, and reliability of their customers’ websites.

“CDNs typically make many copies of their customers’ websites and distribute and cache them around the world,” said Daniel D’Alessandro, co-founder of Rush Hour.

“People browsing a website will be served from their closest cache, which will make the website faster and more responsive, eliminating the performance constraints of distance and bandwidth between client and server.

“CDNs can also improve website reliability – users often won’t notice if the actual website goes down, as long as the caches are up and running.

“Many CDN providers also provide cybersecurity services – blocking attack traffic closest to its origin, long before it nears the target. “

But hackers often attempt to bring down websites and applications through a technique called DDOS – Distributed Denial of Service – where they orchestrate massive increases in traffic to specific weak points in a network with the goal of overloading it.

He added, “Akamai is a venerable and well-respected company around the world, but as we’ve seen twice in the past week, outages can happen to anyone.

“The fact that so many large key organizations and the essential services they provide across Australia can all be shut down simultaneously, regardless of the cause, indicates a critical need for redundancy.

“Businesses that route their traffic through a third party, whether it’s CDN, DDOS protection or whatever, all need a plan B, just like any other critical piece of their IT infrastructure.” .


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